The adoption process is an arduous one, but the resulting reward makes it more than worth it. It is important for families in Boulder to be well-prepared, especially when it comes to the home study portion of adoption. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services explains what adopting couples should know about the home study process.

The home visit can be especially stressful, as this involves a social worker visiting your home to conduct in-depth interviews. When preparing your home, do not worry so much about making it spotless. You want to focus on creating a safe and welcoming space for your new child, which entails removing obvious hazards from around the home. Common safety measures include securing hazardous chemicals, keeping any firearms stored on the property out of reach, and addressing any other obvious hazards.

You and your spouse will also undergo background checks. If you are concerned that you are background check will uncover past transgressions, it is important to get them out in the open as soon as possible. Depending on the nature of the issue, you may be able to explain what you learned and how you moved on to become a responsible and caring individual. Conversely, attempting to conceal a criminal record or other wrongdoing will be looked at unfavorably by the social worker, which could greatly harm your chances of being approved.

Social workers only want what is best for the children being adopted. As a result, you may be refused if you have an extensive or violent criminal history, or if there are instances of abuse in your background. Same-sex couples are given the same consideration as heterosexual couples, and even singles will be considered based on the merits of their living situations, history, and ability to properly care for a child. The entire home study process can take as long as six months in some cases.